Totness Recreation Park VKFF-1754

My final park for Saturday 8th June 2019 was the Totness Recreation Park VKFF-1754, which is situated in the Mount Barker District Council area (MB5).  The park is located about 40 km east of Adelaide.

Screen Shot 2019-06-10 at 7.50.56 pm

Above:- Map showing the location of the Totness Recreation Park in the Adelaide Hills.  Map courtesy of Protected Planet.

The Totness Recreation Park is 41 hectares (101 acres) in size and was established in 1970.  It is divided into two sections by the busy South Eastern Freeway (the main highway between Adelaide and Melbourne).  The northern section consists of 9 hectares (22 acres) of scrub and a dam.  The southern section comprises 32 hectares (79 acres) of scrub.  The park is surrounded by rural properties which are primarily used for grazing.

The park consists of Messmate Stringybark and Manna Gum woodlands, which at one time prior to European colonisation were common throughout the Mount Lofty Ranges.  More than 180 native plants species have been recorded within the park.  Plant species of conservation significance recorded within the park include the state rare Manna Gum and the regionally rare Spider Orchid.

Screen Shot 2019-06-10 at 8.10.18 pm.png

Above:- Aerial shot of the Totness Recreation Park on either side of the South Eastern Freeway.  Image courtesy of Google maps.

I set up in my normal operating spot off Haines Fire Track.

Screen Shot 2019-06-10 at 7.50.45 pm

Above:- An aerial view of the Totness Recreation Park showing my operating spot.  Image courtesy of Protected Planet.

Once again for this activation, I commenced by calling CQ on the 80m band.  First in the log was my ever reliable wife Marija VK5FMAZ.  This was followed by VK6MIL, VK5PL and VK2GR.

The 80m band seemed to be in very good shape.  There was absolutely no man-made noise on the band from within the park, and the static crashes on the band were quite low.

I logged a total of 42 stations on 80m from VK2, VK3, VK4, VK5, VK6, VK7, and New Zealand.  It was nice to log Andrei ZL1TM and Bill ZL2AYZ in New Zealand.  I also spoke with Perrin VK3XPT using his military Clansman transceiver.

DSC_7524

I then moved to the 40m band and called CQ.  Sadly I logged just the one station there, Steve VK4VCO.  As this was a contest I was unable to self spot on parksnpeaks which normally results in a number of calls.

It was starting to get mighty cold in the park, with the temperature having dropped to 6 deg C.  It was now just after 1200 UTC (9.30 p.m. local time).

DSC_7521

I worked the following stations on 80m SSB:-

  1. VK5FMAZ
  2. VK6MIL
  3. VK5PL
  4. VK2GR
  5. VK6OZ
  6. VK3YE
  7. VK6WB
  8. VK3PF
  9. VK3MKE
  10. VK7GH
  11. VK7JGD
  12. VK5FANA
  13. VK3ANL
  14. VK4SMA
  15. VK2NP
  16. ZL1TM
  17. VK3XPT
  18. VK5LJ
  19. VK2DEK
  20. VK4ATH
  21. VK3ARH
  22. ZL2AYZ
  23. VK3TIN
  24. VK3LTL
  25. VK6MB/3
  26. VK6XN
  27. VK2WGW
  28. VK4XAC
  29. VK6POP
  30. VK5AYL
  31. VK3XV
  32. VK2YW
  33. VK3TJS
  34. VK5HEL
  35. VK2LEE
  36. VK3VEF
  37. VK3CWM
  38. VK2VU
  39. VK2WY
  40. VK5VGC
  41. VK4FAAF
  42. VK3GB

I worked the following station on 40m SSB:-

  1. VK4VCO

 

References

Government of South Australia, 2007, ‘Totness Recreation Park Management Plan’

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s